Out of the Garden

Wow, Okay, so I came upon this beaut of a recipe!

It is from: Fit from Conception

If you are not a big fan of breakfast food like me, this might do the trick.

Ingredients:
  • Cream cheese
  • Icing sugar
  • Whole wheat bread
  • Butter
  • Blueberries – which are so perfect in Ontario
  • Sandwich maker (I’m sure you could use a frying pan, but the sandwich maker sealed everything in which was perfection)

Directions:

  1. Mix cream cheese with icing sugar (to taste – I didn’t want it super sweet)
  2. Butter outside of bread
  3. Spread cream cheese mixture on the inside of one slice of bread
  4. Place butter side down on sandwich maker and top with blueberries
  5. Place second piece of bread butter side out on top
  6. Close lid
  7. Grill for about 1 minute

Can I just say this sound AMAZING! This is on my list of recipes to try!

View the original post HERE

A great local food Documentary

WOW! Can I just say that this was an AMAZING documentary! I was hooked from the very beginning. I didn’t even want to pause it to answer my phone.

This documentary really dives into how the local food movement works.

It shows what local food is, how restaurants use local food, the local vs. organic fad, how meat factors into it, and how local and organic labels are used improperly. It also talks about what is next for local farmers.

If you have 30 minutes, I highly recommend this video!

LOCAL – A Short Documentary from Christian Remde on Vimeo.

Out of the Garden: Roast Carrots

Roasted Carrots

Have too many carrots from your garden? Feel like you are eating steamed carrots, carrot soup, and raw carrots? Well, this very simple recipe can get your taste buds singing.

All you need is:

  • 1lb medium sized carrots
  • 1 bunch of asparagus
  • 1 tbs of thyme
  • ½ cup of extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 or three garlic cloves chopped finely
  • 1 /2 cup Parmesan

All you need to do is:

  1. Cut carrots into 1 inch sections
  2. Cut asparagus into 1 – 11/2 inch section bottom inch off
  3. Put into bowl
  4. Pour ½ cup of olive oil
  5. Sprinkle thyme
  6. Salt and pepper to taste
  7. Mix all ingredients
  8. Place on parchment paper on cookie sheet in oven 380oF for 30 min top rack preferred
  9. Top with Parmesan cheese

Mmmm… Enjoy these delicious carrots , there are one of my favourites!

Out Of the Garden: BBQ Potatoes

BBQ Potatoes

Potatoes are a staple in the Canadian diet. That is not necessarily a good thing, as starch is just another form of sugar. So instead of making French Fries, mashed potatoes, or double baked potatoes, make this really amazing and yummy side dish.

All you need is:

  • 1 Yukon gold potato per guest. Use Yukon golds because the skin is very thin and is usually eaten. If you don’t have those in your garden, that is okay.
  • Garlic olive oil
  • Lots of thyme (we use fresh from our herb garden)
  • And salt and pepper

All you need to do is:

  1. Put the potatoes in the microwave – 5-6 minute per 3 potatoes
  2. Cut them in half brush with garlic olive oil on the cut side
  3. Add salt and pepper and lots of thyme
  4. Place face down on BBQ
  5. Until cooked and cut side is toasted

Enjoy the yummy potato recipe, It’s my favourite!

Infographic: Your own garden!

This was pretty amazing. If those of us that have the luxury of having an acre or so of land could build a decent hobby farm, we could really be self-sustainable.

However, this all depends on what your family likes to eat. Ours doesn’t eat a lot of wheat, so we would buy flour. My mom would be driven insane by chickens, but my dog would love them.

Our neighbours have a rather small garden that consists of cucumbers, green beans, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, carrots, and other yummy veggies. It is only about 4-6 square metres. Not big, but we get so much tomatoes and other goodies that we can them. That’s only us! They share with other neighbours too! So having your own is definitely doable!

We also have a herb garden that tastes so yummy in recipes!

For those who don’t have space, maybe a single tomato plant, and a small herb garden would work?

Here is the infographic, click it to see a bigger version.

If you have space what would you include in your garden? Tweet me @OliviaRutt

Is local food bad for the environment? A reaction to Maclean’s

This summer, two Canadian authors produced a book called The Locavore’s Dilemma. It asked some tough questions about why the local food trend is a problem and why it will ruin Canada.  Maclean’s goes into discussion about this book and its arguments.

I found that the arguments made are very extreme in a sense that it doesn’t understand where the local foodies are attempting to go with regard to local food.

For instance, Maclean’s describe The Locavore’s Dilemma as a book that argues “far from making our communities healthier and more sufficient, the local food movement will destroy our economies, ruin out environment and probably lead to more wars, famine and incidences of food poisoning.”

Extreme as that is, they also see that local food is a romantic idea of living off the land, that it would only produce a narrow scale of food, and that it will cost extreme amounts of money to stay local.

“Food activists would rather turn back the clock on those modern developments, close the doors to trade and return to a world where families toiled their land, pesticide and fertilizer-free, and then squeaked by on what they earn from selling their goods at the local famer’s market,” said Maclean’s.

This is impossible. Most people are concerned about where their food comes from for a couple of reasons: concerns with food additives for making safe travel, concerns with ethical food growth, and supporting the local economy.  They might even be concerned about the concept of food miles and how much it costs our environment to transport food. Unfortunately here in Canada, we don’t have the luxury of growing mangos, passionfruit, or bananas. Instead we buy them from the grocery store. But when our food is in season, such as strawberries or corn, you just can’t beat the succulence and flavour of locally grown items.

Even free-range meat puts our mind at ease about the consumption of meat.  Animals are raised and killed humanely, and that may be a reason for people to choose that route.

I think the average person is looking to balance their diet with local food as well as imported fair trade food, but as for the other things that are impossible to get that way, we just get it somewhere else. The idea of being mindful of what you are putting into your body is the most important aspect of the local food movement. Maclean’s ultimately agrees.

You Can check out the full article here: Is Local Food Bad for the Environment?

Taste Real Field Dinner

“Get ready to loosen your belts!” said Mark Kenny, toasting the two hundred guests attending Taste-Real event, in Puslinch, Ontario.

Taste-Real’s Field Dinner celebrates Guelph and Wellington’s fresh harvest. It is a fundraiser event for local food agencies, such as the Guelph Food Bank and the Garden Fresh Food Box Program.

The most important part of this whole event: the local food.

“Local Food means starting at your home, growing what you can, and going out from there” said Kate Vsetula, a volunteer coordinator at the event, “There’s nothing better than knowing where your food comes from, and supporting your local economy, and the health of your family.”

This year’s special guest included Chef Lynn Crawford from the Food Network, who could not stress the importance of local food. “Its all about the chefs, the farmers, the growers coming together to share a wonderful meal on this gorgeous Sunday afternoon.”

The local chefs were preparing roasted farm fresh chicken, while bakers prepared their local grain bread. Even the students of the local Food School were preparing a local peach dessert.

“If I can connect directly to the person who produced without the supply chain between us, I can have a better handle on community,” said baker, David MacRae, “the personal connection makes it taste better.”

The funds raised goes in part to the Guelph Food Bank, where food isn’t just non-perishable.

“Buy local and share local,” said Tracy Marchesich, from the Guelph food bank “A lot of people have the misconception that the food bank is only boxes and cans, but that’s not the case. We have the capacity for ten skids worth of product in our walk-in fridge, so we are trying to encourage the community to donate fresh as well.”

The people really enjoyed themselves, as everyone agreed: “Local just tastes better!”

Check out the photos from the event!